Statoil. The Power of Possible

Get to know Statoil better in three minutes.

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The major energy dilemma.

The major energy dilemma.

In 2025 there will be more than 8 billion people in the world, and in 2050 almost 10 billion. The world will need more energy in the future, and even if we wished it could be so, there is no way that renewable energy sources can meet this need in the short term. Meanwhile production on our oil and gas fields is declining naturally every single year. Of fields currently in production, only 1/3 of today’s capacity will exist in twenty years’ time. This means that we need to find more oil and gas, as well as recover more from already existing fields, while steadily making continued efforts within renewable energy. Statoil wishes to help achieve all this in a responsible and sustainable manner.

Learn more about energy realities
Climate.

Climate.

The world will require increasing volumes of energy in the coming decades. That’s an unquestionable fact. But we also need to curb emissions. If the world is to succeed in doing this, we will have to transform our energy consumption into a more sustainable pattern. We will need much more renewable energy and will have to reduce our consumption of coal, using gas instead. In addition, oil demand must be reduced. At the same time we must increase global energy efficiency by applying new energy technologies. Statoil wishes to be part of the solution, and not of the problem. Statoil currently numbers among the producers with the lowest carbon emissions. Furthermore, we are concentrating more and more on renewable energy, as exemplified by the large windmill park Sheringham Shoal off the UK’s east coast. We are in support of the UN’s efforts to establish a new climate accord. In order to prepare for a low-emission future, we long ago started including a carbon price in all our projects, and our basic standpoint is that there should be a quite hefty increase in this price. Pollution should cost, and the polluter should pay. Countries must cooperate closely in order to reduce emissions. Statoil believes that the EU’s quota system – which includes 31 countries with binding emission targets – can also serve as a model for other regions of the world.

Learn more about our climate strategy
Sustainable production.

Sustainable production.

Statoil has some very stringent requirements to health, safety and the environment. We have long numbered among the oil companies in the world with the lowest carbon emissions – they are less than half the oil industry average. For several years we have also ranked among the leading companies when it comes to carbon capture and storage (CCS). CCS means that the CO2 is stored permanently and not emitted into the atmosphere, which is an important measure in combatting climate change. We have stored roughly 15 million tonnes of carbon from Sleipner and two million tonnes from Snøhvit in rock formations under the seabed. That’s equivalent to two years’ road traffic emissions in Norway. This has led to our company topping the Fortune Magazine’s rankings for corporate social responsibility. To lead a field of 1400 companies is a major accolade for us.

Learn more about our efforts within sustainable production
Thanks to the North Wind, Frost and Darkness!

Thanks to the North Wind, Frost and Darkness!

Statoil would never be where it is today without the benefit of all the lessons the company has learnt by operating in the harsh, Norwegian climate. Wind, snow and cold have made us good at tackling challenges. The dark has taught us to seek light. It’s this frame of mind that has made our petroleum story an adventure. We now have uses all over the world for our North Sea experience. Our belief that the impossible is possible has helped us become the leading offshore nation in the world.
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Learn more about our petroleum adventure
From rowboat to robot (ROV).

From rowboat to robot (ROV).

Though Norway has always had a close affinity with the sea and ships, from the Viking age onward, the country’s modern vessels are quite advanced. Pictured here is a remotely operated vehicle, or ROV. The hydrocarbon of the future will be located further from land, at greater depths and in colder regions, where almost all operations need to be performed remotely. This is where the ROVs play a key role. The development of seabed installations has put Norway in the vanguard of robot technology. The water depth in some areas is so great that it can take a ROV 1-2 hours just to get down to the seabed.

Learn more about our journey to the bottom of the ocean
The positive ripple effects.

The positive ripple effects.

The development of oil and gas in Norway has benefitted the whole country by helping build a sound and robust economy that provides us with a host of opportunities. What is not equally well known is that the petroleum industry has also helped Norway become a major exporter of advanced technological expertise. As a result of this, the industry accounts for almost 250 000 jobs in Norway. Of the 428 municipalities in Norway, 422 of them have at least one inhabitant who works in or with the oil and gas industry. We represent an industry that is increasingly technology driven; fewer people work on the platform deck and more work with advanced technology and are involved with state-of-the-art engineering solutions. The ripple effects of this are also of benefit to many smaller local communities in Norway.

See more examples of ripple effects
Norwegians are good at the bottom of the sea.

Norwegians are good at the bottom of the sea.

There’s a very important chapter in the story of Norwegian oil and gas that is invisible to most people. It takes place on the seabed and is the fruit of the extensive, world-leading subsea industry based in Norway. Statoil is now concentrating on subsea installations that represent modern, compact and more environmentally friendly solutions. These installations have improved carbon efficiency and are less exposed to bad weather. They can withstand great depths and high pressures, while increasing recovery from the reservoirs. In addition the operational costs for such installations are lower. More than 50% of the oil and gas we currently extract derives from seabed wells. Thanks to the close cooperation between Norwegian suppliers and Statoil, Norway currently leads the world in the field of subsea-technology.

Learn more about our seabed installations
Less coal, more gas!

Less coal, more gas!

Europe requires increasing volumes of energy for continued economic growth and development. Norway is the world’s third biggest exporter of natural gas, and therefore plays an important role in providing Europe with a stable supply of energy. The quickest way to achieve fewer emissions is to switch from coal to gas in electricity production: natural gas emissions are just 50% of the emissions from coal consumption.

Learn more about gas in a climate perspective
Drilling isn’t boring.

Drilling isn’t boring.

One of the most challenging tasks we perform is to penetrate right down to the where the oil is found. Statoil has long experience of drilling in harsh weather conditions in regions where many technical obstacles have to be overcome. These fields are often characterised by their very deep wells with high pressures and temperatures. The drilling contractors and service companies with whom Statoil collaborates are world leaders in their fields. We can drill both vertically and horizontally. In some cases the drill string can be up to 10 000 metres long.

Learn more about advanced drilling operations
Oil and gas recovery.

Oil and gas recovery.

It’s not sufficient simply to find oil and gas. You’ve got to pump up as much of it as possible as well – and this can present some formidable challenges. Statoil is currently a world-leading company when it comes to improved oil recovery (IOR): Our average expected recovery rate on NCS oil fields is as high as 50%. By way of comparison, the industry average is approx. 35%. Our ambition now is to recover 60%. Statoil is this year opening a new R&D centre at Rotvoll in Trondheim to research further into how we can utilise our resources in the best possible way.

Learn more about IOR
Nobody can do everything alone.

Nobody can do everything alone.

Without the cooperation of talented suppliers, Statoil would never have enjoyed the same success. For example, we now have in Norway a globally leading subsea industry. Several industrial clusters have established themselves here. These milieux account for roughly 70% of all seabed technology expertise. The excellent collaboration between academia and the country’s many small entrepreneurs is also a significant feature of the Norwegian oil saga.

See how subsea production has developed in collaboration with the supplier industry
Statoil... in outer space?

Statoil... in outer space?

An idea, once conceived, can travel far. All the way to Mars, in fact. Seabed installations share many similarities with the sort of robots that are used in space, as both are operated automatically by remote control. They also operate in very special environments. The space industry has for many years shown a lot of interest in our industry, believing the drill-hole technologies we utilise in the North Sea to be extremely relevant in connection with its Mars projects. Statoil therefore recently signed an agreement with space industry participants with the intention of focusing on the following research areas: super computers, materials, robot technology, the development of new tools and communication possibilities.

Learn more about our space-age plans
From the North Sea to Newfoundland.

From the North Sea to Newfoundland.

What began as a Norwegian oil adventure is becoming a global story. Since start-up in the early 1990s, Statoil’s international operations have grown considerably and currently account for almost 1/3 of the company’s total production. We are currently engaged in projects over the whole world – in America, Asia, Australia and Africa. In conjunction with Norwegian suppliers, Statoil is drawing upon the valuable experience the company has gained on the Norwegian continental shelf to develop other countries’ natural resources in a profitable, responsible and sustainable manner.

Learn more about our international operations
The future belongs to those who create it.

The future belongs to those who create it.

We cannot just sit still; we have to develop all the time. In Statoil we are technology optimists, convinced that new technology can make the world a better place. Looking back, we can see that engineering expertise in the field of hydroelectric power helped make Norway adept at conceiving and producing major offshore concrete constructions such as Troll. Our offshore expertise led to our becoming a world leader in subsea technology. And this know-how might well lead in turn to some totally new and different fields of expertise. Our collaboration with the space industry exemplifies this. We believe that open innovation and cooperation provide the key to success.

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